Growing local ag to sustain us

Posted on Dec 19, 2019 in Capitol Connection, Featured
Fern Elementary principal Glen Miyasato, parent Hala Leitu and daughter Abriella,-- fans of Jump Start Breakfast.

Fern Elementary principal Glen Miyasato, parent Hala Leitu and daughter Abriella,– fans of Jump Start Breakfast.

More locally grown food for schools, other state programs –The DOE’s ‘Aina Pono, farm-to-school program and the new farm-to-state program for local correctional facilities are building a network to increase island food production. The state Department of Agriculture (HDOA) is producing more timely information for local farmers to help in doubling the state’s food production. Also, First Lady Dawn Amano-Ige’s “Jump Start Breakfast” program in the schools promoted the benefits of locally grown products.

Inmates at Waiawa Correctional Facility work on the prison farm.

Inmates at Waiawa Correctional Facility work on the prison farm.

  • HDOA increasing local meat production –  The local beef and pork industries are benefitting from low-interest financing and legislative funding to develop harvesting capacity.
  • More farmers to work Galbraith lands in Wahiawa – A second round of farmer selection is under way by the Agribusiness Development Corporation. Seven farmers will be chosen to raise crops on 400 acres of land, based on their agriculture experience and their ability to sustain an economically viable operation.
  • NELHA helps entrepreneur start-ups, state’s aquaculture industry – UH and the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawai‘i Authority are joining with HATCH, the world’s first sustainable aquaculture accelerator program, to attract investments and create jobs.
  • Governor Ige with long-time farmer Larry Jefts.

    Governor Ige with long-time farmer Larry Jefts.

    Hands-on ag training for inmates – UH GoFarm is partnering with Waiawa Correctional Facility to teach inmates how to grow a variety of produce. The vegetables are harvested for meals at the facility. At the Women’s Community Correctional Center, the female inmates are learning job skills, thanks to the Lani-Kailua Outdoor Circle. The women develop skills in plant propagation and food preparation as well as care for goats who eat invasive vegetation.

Read more in the January Capitol Connection newsletter

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