Protecting the ‘āina and our communities

Posted on Dec 19, 2019 in Capitol Connection, Featured
Protecting areas such as the Nāpali Coast and coral reefs is a high priority for DLNR and the Ige administration.

Protecting areas such as the Nāpali Coast and coral reefs is a high priority for DLNR and the Ige administration.

Saving coral, sustaining water for everyone – It’s easy to take for granted the reefs that surround us and the water that sustains us. The state Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), working with many stakeholders, initiated the Coral Pledge to prevent further damage to this fragile ecosystem.

  • Equitable water supplies for renewable energy, Hawaiian homesteading and farming – The state has updated plans and agreements to ensure the long-term protection of water resources, most notably for Kaua‘i and Maui.
  • New energy-efficient DLNR building for Maui – Community members can now meet in Wailuku with DLNR staff from four divisions.
  • “Responsible tourism” promoted by Hawai‘i Tourism Authority (HTA) – While tourism growth continues to drive Hawai‘i’s economy, HTA is allocating more funds to protect the state’s natural resources and
    The state has initiated the Coral Pledge to prevent further damage to this fragile ecosystem.

    The state has initiated the Coral Pledge to prevent further damage to this fragile ecosystem.

    perpetuate Native Hawaiian culture along with a “kuleana campaign” to educate visitors about safety, conservation and Hawaiian values.

  •  Protecting, planning for sea level rise -The state Department of Transportation estimates that about 15 percent of the state’s coastal highways will be affected by sea level rise by 2100. Short-and long-term solutions are being planned for discussion with the communities affected.
  • Kaua‘i’s North Shore reopens famed Nāpali Coast trail and parks with new protections – From flood devastation to a model for the entire state — the communities of Hā‘ena  and Wainiha celebrated the reopening of Kūhiō Highway and new approaches to managing visitor traffic to protect the natural resources of the area.
A GEM$ program helped Highway Inn's Monica Toguchi Ryan and Russell Ryan install solar panels on their restaurant.

A GEM$ program helped Highway Inn’s Monica Toguchi Ryan and Russell Ryan install solar panels on their restaurant.

  • Energy financing provides savings for residents – Low and moderate-income households, renters, non-profits and small businesses now have a chance to lower their electricity bills through the new Green Energy Money $aver (GEM$) On-Bill Program. The program provides loans to install solar PV systems and helps more people lower their energy costs.
  • More clean energy projects supported – The Public Utilities Commission approved numerous clean energy projects, programs and infrastructure investments in 2019 to accelerate progress toward its 100 percent renewable energy goal for electricity generation.

Read more in the January Capitol Connection newsletter

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