The ‘silent majority’ speaks out

Posted on Aug 29, 2019 in Capitol Connection, Featured
Samuel Wilder King II and Malia Martin, co-organizers of the Imua TMT rally.

Samuel Wilder King II and Malia Martin, co-organizers of the Imua TMT rally.

Many TMT supporters believe in the benefits for students in STEM education.

Many TMT supporters believe in the benefits for students in STEM education.

Among Native Hawaiian TMT supporters are a grandfather and his grandson who want to encourage others to show support for the project and astronomy in Hawai‘i. The grandfather is Oliver Crowell, a Kamehameha Schools alumnus interviewed by KGMB’s Hawaii News Now. Crowell said he knows of many Native Hawaiians who support TMT but are reluctant to speak out since the issue has become so personal.

Famed Hōkūle'a navigator Chad Kalepa Baybayan has been a vocal advocate for the project and its advancement of astronomy and education.

Famed Hōkūle’a navigator Chad Kalepa Baybayan has been a vocal advocate for the project and its advancement of astronomy and education.

According to the news report, Crowell said the state can’t afford to pass up the educational benefits of the project. “Some of us who look back at our lives see the opportunities that lie ahead for young students today, what we never got. I wouldn’t want them to miss out on that,” he said.

Meanwhile, Crowell’s grandson Cody wrote his own letter to Governor Ige and came to one Imua TMT rally with his family. In his letter, Cody wrote: “Please hear me as a young Hawaiian. I’m only 12 years old, but my heart feels like an ancient Hawaiian soul. I believe my ancestors would want the telescope for me, for our world. Why would we fight when we have the attention of the world. Now is our time to show we can unite. We can make a difference the world can follow. You made the world listen. Now make them see how intelligent we are, how we can work together.”

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